2017 Fall News & Views - page 4

J A N U A R Y 2 0 1 0 , V O L U M E 1
4
A
ll of this can be impacted by the diversity to be found
both in the communities themselves as well as in the
older adult population as a whole. Therefore, it's important to
understand how the population of our state, like that of the
country, is diversifying. As Assisted Living, Memory Care, and
CCRCs continue to provide service and care to a large portion
of California's older adults, we will need to be ready to also
provide environments that are inclusive and open to a more
diverse group of residents. So, let's take a look at how diversity
is changing our older adult population.
Assisted Living, Memory Care, and Continuing Care Retirement Communities
(CCRCs) pride themselves on creating environments where residents feel truly
at home. This sense of belonging is due to many factors, according to a 2016
Promatura study
i
—including the friendliness of staff members, the comfort
and security of their surroundings, and the ability to form quality relationships.
The United States
According to a 2005 AARP fact sheet
i
, ethnic minorities
made up 13 percent of the 65-plus older adult population
in 1990. At the time, the fact sheet projected that this
would rise to 23 percent by 2020. However, that milestone
was reached four years early in 2016, based on data from
the AARP DataExplorer website
ii
.
Among the different identified minorities, the largest
increase between 2011 and 2016 was seen amongst
the Asian population, with an increase of more than 40
A
Snapshot
ethnic diversity
Among Older Adults
of
By Katie Cappello, Director of Communications
C L I F O R N I A A S S I S T E D L I V I N G A S S O C I A T I O N
1,2,3 5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12,13,14,...28
Powered by FlippingBook